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Archive for the ‘Technique Tutorial’ Category

Wednesday’s Challenge #40: Patti’s Lanyard and More

Lanyard by Davina-Marie

We are in the home stretch for Workshop prep so this Challenge has a working kind of theme, this week, we are working on a name tag lanyard. This pattern is special to me cause it is the first thing I ever shuttle tatted. It was my first Guild meeting and Lois showed me how to do the elusive “flip” maneuver and sent me on my way. it is a perfect purse project because all the thread and beads are on the shuttle and if your shuttle has a hook, it is an all in one piece. You will need a large shuttle to hold all the beads and thread, I prefer the Tatsy. I have modified mine to include a hook before I decorated it. As it gets longer, I use a diaper pin to keep the length under control.

Each Lanyard takes about 300 size 6 beads and 25-30 yards of size 20 tatting cotton. I made mine with a mixture of pink beads and Lizbeth 20, 621 Dusty Rose.

This pattern is written by ShuttleBirds’ President, Patti Duff. She doesn’t have a web site but you can reach her thru the Shuttlebird Tatting Guild. We thank her for letting us use her pattern here. You can download the PDF file   Beaded Lanyard.

Lariat1 Lariat2

The two chatelaines to the left are variations of this pattern and are part of the scholarship raffle at workshop. They are made from Lizbeth 20; 139, Fruit Fizz and 184, Rainbow Splash.

You can be part of our raffle by contacting Natalie or myself for ticket information.

We hope you enjoy making yourself a lanyard  and for all of you guild members who made theirs last year, send in a picture so we can add you to the gallery.

May your shuttles be filed and your knots be merry,

Davina-Marie

 

Extra Bonus: English Lesson

chat·e·laine

[shat-l-eyn; French shahtuhlen]

noun, plural chat·e·laines [shat-l-eynz; French shahtuhlen]

1. the mistress of a castle.
2. the mistress of an elegant or fashionable household.
3. a hooklike clasp or a chain for suspending keys, trinkets, scissors, a watch, etc., worn at the waist by women.
4. a woman’s lapel ornament resembling this.
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Technique Tutorial: Split Ring (SR)

The split ring is a wonderful little technique and is used in a variety of patterns. It is most useful for creating one ring directly next to another in a pattern or for stepping up out of a round.  The first pattern I tackled that used split rings was Anne B’s Minor Norwegian Dragon (featured as Weekly Challenge #2). Please let me know in the comments if you have a link to a tutorial for split rings that is not mentioned here or if you have a request for a technique you would like to see featured. Thanks!

This page contains only split ring (SR) tutorials. A tutorial page for Single Shuttle Split Rings (SSSR) is planned in the future.

Links to Video Tutorials for Shuttle Tatters:

Split Ring Tutorial by Linda Davies – This YouTube video features audio instruction for two different hand positioning methods to achieve the split ring. This is the first time I have heard of the “dead spider” method. She explains the process well, but the camera is too far out to see the individual stitches. [Contains background music].

Frivolite-Tatting Lesson 12 – two-shuttle split ring by Karen Cabrera – This YouTube video features text instructions and close up video of the two hand positioning techniques for the split ring. [Video is silent].

Tatting – The Split Ring by 11 Frivole – This YouTube video features text instructions and close up video of the “dead spider” method. [Clock/metronome can be heard the entire video].

Tatting a Split Ring by tatmantats – This YouTube video features audio instructions and close up video of the “dead spider” method.

 

Links to Video Tutorials for Needle Tatters:

Tatting – Split Rings (SR.) in Needle Tatting by RustiKate – This YouTube video features a needle tatting split ring tutorial. I have never tried needle tatting. She is very good at explaining her steps, but I would prefer she move slower during the actual demonstration of the technique. I would also be worried that I would forget to re-thread the needle. [She tats very quickly].

Picture Tutorials:

How to make a Split Ring by Jon Yusoff – This tutorial blog post features step by step pictures and text directions of the “dead spider” split ring process.

 

Articles:

Two-Shuttle Tatting: Split Rings for the Terrified by Williams Daniel – This article shares a bit about the history of the split ring in addition to giving written instructions for the split ring for both needle and shuttle tatters.

 

Happy tatting!

~ Natalie

 

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